Solar Panel Installation Packages Pricing 


Our Systems Quick Links:   2.0kW,     3.0kW,    4.0kW,     5kW,_   6kW   Hybrid / Off Grid 
 

Get Ready for a "Battery Storage Revolution" Install an Inverter with battery capability

Don't send your excess power to the Grid for $0.08 cents store it and save @ $0.28 cents

1.5 kW Systems  Free Call 1800 255 283

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COMPONENTS

6x 260W

ReneSola Panels


3kW Delta Inverter

----10 Year Warranty------3kW Panel Capability

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Clenergy Solar Roof Mounting

 Output

1.56kW Panels

 6.3 kWh/day

2,373 kWh/Yr

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Price 

$2,499 

STC Rebate $1,116

Savings:$536/Year  

 
Read More Enquiry Form 
Finance min amount
$3000
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COMPONENTS

6x 265W

Q-Cell G4 Panels

12/25yr warranty


SMA SUNNY BOY

2.5KW INVERTER 


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Clenergy Solar Roof Mounting

Output

1.59kW Panels

6.5 kWh/day

2,373kWh/Year

 
 

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Price

$3,119 

STC Rebate $1,116

Savings $536/Year

Read more Enquiry Form

*From $29 per week 
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 2.0 kW Systems

  Free Call 1800 255 283 

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COMPONENTS

8x 260W

ReneSola Panels


3kW Delta Inverter

10 Year Warranty 
3kW Panel Capability

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Clenergy Mounting 
5 Year Warranty

Output

2.08kW Panels 8.4 kWh/day
3,127 kWh/Year
 
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Price 

$2,759 

STC Rebate $1,477
Savings $658/Year
Read More Enquiry Form


Finance min amount $3000


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COMPONENTS

8x 265W
Q-Cell G4 Panels
 12/25yr warranty

SMA SUNNY BOY Inverter 2.5kW 

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Clenergy Mounting
5 Year Warranty


Output

2.12kW Panels
 
8.56 kWh/day
3,127 kWh/Year 
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Read more &
Enquiry Form
 
 


Price 

$3,379
STC Rebate $1,476
Savings $658/year

 
*From $33 per week 
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3.0 kW Systems
FREE CALL 1800 255 283

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COMPONENTS


12x 260W
ReneSola Panels

3kW Delta Inverter
10 Year Warranty 

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Clenergy mounting
5 Year Warranty
 
Output
3.12kW Panels
12.6 KWH/day
4,599 kWh / year

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Price 
$3,699
STC Rebate $2,236
Savings $903/year


Read More Enquiry Form


  *From $29 per week   
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Components
12x 265W
Q-Cell G4 Panels 

12/25 year warranty

SMA SUNNY BOY 
3.0kW Inverter

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Clenergy Mounting 
5 Year Warranty 

Output

3.18kW Panels
12.89 kWh/day
 4,709 kWh/Year 
 
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Read more 
Enquiry Form
 

Price 

$4,459
STC Rebate $2,236
Savings:$903/year


 From $33 per week  


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 4.0 kW Systems   Free Call 1800 255 283 

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Components 16x260
ReneSola Panels 
10/25 year warranty

5kW Delta Inverter
10 Year Warranty  

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Clenergy Mounting
5 Year Warranty
Output
4.16kW Panels
16.8 kWh/day
6,132 kWh /year 
 
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Price 
$4,698
STC Rebate $2,952
Savings $1,205/Year


Read More Enquiry form


 *From $33 per week 
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Components

16x 265W Q-Cell

Pro G4 Panels

12/25 year warranty


SMA Sunny Boy 4.0kW Inverter


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Clenergy Mounting

5 Year Warranty

Output

4.24kW Panels

17.13 kWh/day

 6,255 kWh /year

 

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 Read more 
Enquiry Form

Price

$5,748

STC Rebate $2,952


Savings $1,205 year 

 *From $33 per week   

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5.0 kW Systems
Free Call 1800 255 283 

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COMPONENTS


20x 260W
ReneSola Panels 
10/25 year warranty

5kW Delta Inverter
10 Year Warranty

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Clenergy mounting
5 YEAR WARRANTY
Output


21 kWh/day
7,665 kWh/Year
 
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PRICE


$5,998
STC Rebate $3,708
Savings $1,506/year
Read More Enquiry Form


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COMPONENTS

20x 265W
Q-Cell Pro G4 Panels
12/25 year warranty 


SMA SUNNY BOY 5.0kW INVERTER  


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Clenergy Mounting

5 YEAR WARRANTY

Output

5.3kW Panels

21 kWh/day

7,665 kWh /year

  

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 Read more 
Enquiry Form

Price 

$6,498
 
STC Rebate $3,800

Savings $1,106/year

 *From $39 per week  

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6.0 kW Systems  Free Call 1800 255 283 
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COMPONENTS

24x 260W

ReneSola Panels 

10/25 year warranty


5kW Delta Inverter

10 Year Warranty

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Clenergy mounting

5 YEAR WARRANTY

Output

6.24kW Panels

25 kWh / day

9,198 kWh / Year
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Price 

$6,200

STC Rebate $4,464

Saving $1200 / Year



* From $44 per Week 

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COMPONENTS

24x 265W Q-Cell

Pro G4 Panels

12/25 year warranty 


SMA SUNNY BOY

5.0kW INVERTER  


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Clenergy Mounting

5 YEAR WARRANTY

Output

6.36kW  Panels 

24 kWh / Day

8,760 kWh / Year

  

 

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Price 

$6,988

 

STC Rebate $4,464

Savings $1,106/year

  

 *From $44 per week 

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Thinking of Installing a Hybrid Inverter

Information You Should Know Prior To Purchase

Please be Aware!!: Most All-In-1 Hybrid Inverters will only supply a small amount of power if the Grid is down, they are unable to cope supplying full house loads its due to their low continuous supply amperage  rating & some Hybrids will not function at all without the Grid. If you are a relatively low night time power consumer, or happy to top up the shortfall of demand from the grid there is a few ALL-In-1-Hybrid Inverter solutions that can meet your needs at a reasonable cost, These All in one inverters are also good for zero export control (Great for SWER Line rural properties-not allowing excess energy to be sent back to the grid and in-turn allowing larger solar arrays to be installed. All in 1 inverter Links here Fronius 3ph Symo Hybrid,  SolaX HybridZeus Appollo Z21

The Selectronic & SMA Systems we sell (Hybrid systems Link ) are serious systems, which make it possible to kiss the grid good bye forever but they will cost more to purchase over an All in 1 Hybrid Inverter. SMA and Selectronic have been around for many years, supplying power to remote areas around the globe with no grid available. So if you're thinking of getting hybrid / Battery ready now, then investing thousands of dollars later in to batteries please make sure you purchase a quality inverter to charge and protect your battery bank & confirm that the inverter you are buying now can do exactally as you hoped when it comes time to add a Battery Bank Later


New Energex and Ergon Solar Metering Charges
Our Systems Quick Links:    1.5kW,      2.0kW,      3.0kW,     4.0kW    &    Commercial
If you don't see a particular Brand you want here then just ask us to get you a quote on it, easy as! Here 


 

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List of Tier 1 Panel Suppliers

All Panels and Sales Terms & Conditions are not the same even in Tier 1 

Tier 1 Status: A Vertically Integrated Company (Manufacturing from the raw silicon which makes the individual solar cells all the way to achieve the end product, a complete panel) This is a higher level of commitment as a company standing. 

  • Investing more in R&D (Research & product Development), achieving higher module efficiencies.
  • Superior production line quality checks and more of them 
  • Fully automated manufacturing facility right down to packaging, ready for freight. No hand manufacturing in the process which can lead to sub quality joints causing oxidation or induced moisture which can cause earthing Faults  

 

You need to look at individual Warranty & Performance statistics to see what is actually better value for your hard earned $ 

  • Warranty Start Dates Some manufacturers may use the date stamped on the front of the panel which can be in the serial number OR first purchaser of panels as the starting warranty date, and not the date the end user has the system installed
  • Is there a linear performance warranty? and is the warranty backed by a 3rd party insurer and is it protecting you in Australia? 
  • Is the warranty transferable? if you sell your house and move on?
  • Do the panels Have PID Free Certification (Potential Induced Degradation) or also known as "Hot Spots" PID Free Ensuring a longer Performing Module
  • Does the manufacturer have an office here in Australia. Small direct importers of cheaper products can disappear fast when bad batches of panels are reported, leaving you with no warranty. Importers are solely responsible for all product warranty claims in Australia.
  • Positive Power Tolerance: If a module is rated at 250W has a +power tolerance of 0-+5% it will not perform under 250W but could perform as high as 255W output under STC "Standard Test Conditions". Some modules maybe Plus minus 3% power tolerance so can perform under their rated name plate of 250W by as much as 3% under STC.
  • Will you void your warranty if you miss or decline a scheduled service outlined in a purchase contract? 

 
Some of these extra panel features can add around $770 inc gst to a 5kW system.

This is just between Tier 1 level manufacturing Tier2-3 Price difference could be as much as $1200 difference and even more depending on country of origin.
 
"Like the old saying goes "You only get what you pay for" 
 
List only compares capacity of manufacturing and not in any way quality from one Tier 1 manufacturer to the other.

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Other Popular Panel options we sell.

 

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All Black Perlight           Mono Cell

For Installations where   Aesthetics Really Counts

Call or email for quotes on this product 

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Perlight Data Sheet here

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 Trina Honey DataSheet here

 If you don't see a particular Brand you want here then just ask us to get you a quote on it, easy as! Here

 

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Advertised Web Pricing Details



Honesty and Integrity is what you get. Our Electrical Company is over 7 Years old.
Rest assured with a top quality installation from the people who own and run the business!
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The not so fine print
  • Price does not include network charges to connect to the grid if your supply authority are charging OR decide to charge for this service in the future. In QLD there is no charge at this point, In VIC charges can range between $160-$340.
  • Travel to 80km included in cost. Charges above $1.50/km
  • Extras are: Tile roof $200, Double Storey$150, Tilt frame $35 per panel.
  • Price does not include meter box or Circuit board upgrades they must be up to current standard 
  • Pricing does not include building structural changes to accommodate the system.
  • Payment: 10% Deposit via C/Card-(no fee) OR Direct Deposit and Balance is due on the day of compeletion of systems installation Credit Card purchase for balance on completion add 1.5% this option only applies to all the above residential packages
  • All Plant for installation is to be installed on the same building and no trenching would be required.
  • You must be eligable to receive the STC rebate STC Rebate Explained 
  • *Finance is provided through a third party, Company is- "Finance My Solar". Weekly repayment finance estimates for approved customers intended as a guide only, all terms over 60 Months up to <$15,000 & 84 Months >$15,000, min amount to be financed is $3,000AUD & bank + establishment fees apply. Price shown does not include financed total out of pocket expense to purchaser. Price shown is total out of pocket expense for purchaser paying by cash. We will arrange Finance My Solar to contact customer independently, if customer verbally agrees to GL Solar passing on their details to Finance My Solar. GL Solar has no bearing on any finance details what so ever. GL Solar is not licensed to give financial advice. It is up to the purchaser to carry out their own independent finance research to find a method of finance that best suits their needs.
 
ROI is based on consuming 1/3% of the energy that a solar system will produce @ 30 cents/kWh-(avg Qld buy in rate) & selling 2/3 back to the grid @ 8cents/kWh (offered by some Qld power retailers) For North facing roofs East West production can be down 10% some months of the year depending on steepness of roof pitch. For smaller systems 1.5kW is based on 2/3 consumption & 1/3 sell back, 2.0kW is based on 50/50% consumption/sell back. See detailed package descriptions from links in Residential Packages Tab


QLD Solar Bonus scheme Energex Grid http://www.dews.qld.gov.au/energy-water-home/electricity/solar-bonus-scheme/frequently-asked-question

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New Energex and Ergon metering charges

What is happening?

From 1 August 2015, Energex will:
  • Introduce upfront metering charges as detailed below.

 full list of these services and prices are available on the Energex Pricing page of our website.


Energex is implementing changes to how customers pay for individual metering connections and personalised metering enhancements/alterations from 1 July 2015 to align with National Rules set by the Australian Energy Regulator (AER). This will result in changes to how customers are charged for some metering services.

Due to late AER changes, Energex has made the decision to delay the charging of upfront metering charges until 1 August 2015, to allow the communication of this information to our customers and our industry partners.
 

What are the changes?


From 1 July 2015, Energex has:
  • Introduced a range of cost reflective prices for services where it can be identified that the customer requested that service, outlined by the AER.  This includes multi-phase upgrade requests.

Please note - if Energex can reprogram the existing metering onsite instead of installing a new meter, a reconfiguration fee will be charged instead of an upfront metering charge. This fee is $91.53 (exc.GST) for a basic meter reconfiguration.

It is important to note these upfront charges will apply to electricity retailers and are likely to be passed onto customers through their retail electricity bill.

 
  • Introduced an ongoing Daily Metering Service Charge applied per tariff to cover costs such as meter reading and maintenance as shown below:

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Industry News
 
 
 
 
 

 

Solar Bonus Scheme changes :New Rate 9.07 cents 

The Queensland Government has recently made an announcement about changes to the Solar Bonus Scheme.

9.07 cent feed-in tariff (FiT) - Customers receiving the 8 cent per kilowatt hour rate will be transferred to the new 9.07c/kWh rate from 1 July 2014. All new eligible PV system owners connecting to Ergon Energy's network will also receive 9.07c/kWh. The rate is set by theQueensland Competition Authority to reflect the value of the energy customers' export to the Queensland electricity grid. This FiT will be paid by your electricity retailer.

44 cent feed-in tariff (FiT) - The legislated 44 cent FiT will not change for customers already on that rate, provided they maintain their eligibility under the Solar Bonus Scheme.

For more information, visit the Queensland Government Department of Energy and Water Supplywebsite.

Name changes impact Solar Bonus Scheme eligibility

Under changes to legislation which took effect on 23 November 2012, a solar PV system earning the 44c FiT will lose that eligibility if the customer ceases to be the electricity account holder or one or more names are added to the account holders.

Exceptions apply for customers who transfer their electricity account into the name of their spouse or add their spouse to the account. If one or more of multiple account holders at a premises are removed from the account but at least one original account holder remains and no new names are added, the system will retain its 44c FiT eligibility.

Above Information from www.ergon.com.au/network/contractors-and-industry/solar-pv-installers/solar-bonus-scheme-changes



Delta Electronics New RPI Home Series 5kW Inverter 
  • Duel MPPT to suit 2 different roof orientations
  • Solid Di-Cast Aluminium Construction (Gecko Proof)
  • Standard 10 Year Warranty
  • Web Monitoring App for Android & I Phone
  • 40+ year old company
  • Great product & well priced
    Data Sheet Here pdf will open in new blank window
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Double-digit shock as electricity bills set to surge by 21. 4 percent

POWER bills are set to skyrocket by more than 20 per cent, adding hundreds of dollars to the average annual electricity bill.
The Courier-Mail can reveal the the Queensland Competition Authority will recommend a 21.4 per cen increase in power prices in 2013/14

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http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/electricity-bill-shock/story-e6freoof-1226583094724


 GL Solar @ Farmfest 2013 

Toowoomba field Days   4 - 6 June

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Solar and wind surge while demand slumps

Electricity consumption in the National Electricity Market (NEM) states continues to fall. Consumption for the first six months of 2013 was 2.5 per cent lower than the same time last year. On a financial year basis electricity consumption was 2.6 per cent lower in the last 12 months compared to the previous 12 months ending June 30, 2012

Read More: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/3/energy-markets/solar-and-wind-surge-while-demand-slumps#ixzz2Ydm2CAsP


Conergy files for insolvency as solar crisis deepens

German solar group Conergy has filed for insolvency, putting about 800 jobs at risk and becoming the latest casualty in an industry battered by overcapacity, plunging prices and a trade dispute between Europe and China.

Once Europe's largest solar company, Conergy has been fighting for months to secure fresh investment and a deal with its creditors, and earlier this week it had looked close to an agreement.

Read More:  http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/7/8/solar-energy/conergy-files-insolvency-solar-crisis-deepens


Australia's future 'lies in solar power'

When people think of solar power, the panels on rooftops, known as photovoltaics, come to mind.
But experts say Australia's future lies in solar thermal. SBS' reporter PJ Madam reports.

In Canberra, giant 'dishes' covered in mirrors, soak up the sun. They're the biggest in the world. 

One dish can power 100 homes. Imagine what a whole field could do. The reflection makes it hot enough to cook. On the dish itself, it's 900 degrees. 

Read More: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1135832/Australias-future-lies-in-solar-power


New Solar Thermal Plant being built near Dalby QLD 27/6/13

Kogan Creek Solar Boost Project

Kogan Creek Solar Boost Project (KCSBP) is the largest solar thermal project in the southern hemisphere.

The $104.7 million project will incorporate solar thermal technology into CS Energy's Kogan Creek Power Station near Dalby in south west Queensland.

The solar thermal addition is expected to increase the station's capacity by up to 44 megawatts under peak solar conditions and improve plant fuel efficiency.

http://www.dews.qld.gov.au/energy-industry/renewable-energy/projects/kogan-creek-solar-boost-project


Are Beer and Cigarettes the New Bioenergy? 10/7/13

Don Draper and fellow “Mad Men” would likely be horrified, but alcohol and tobacco — long joined at the hip by chain smokers and heavy drinkers — are countering the U.S.’ current aversion to excess by rebranding themselves as new sources of bioenergy.

Tobacco, which has suffered declining market share and price yields for decades in the U.S., could reinvent itself as a genetically-altered biomass for production of biodiesel, bio-gasoline, or bio-jet fuels.

The spirits industry, meanwhile, is already using their industrial beer and liquor byproducts to generate bioenergy as a means of offsetting operational costs.

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2013/07/are-beer-and-cigarettes-the-new-bioenergy


New Battery Design

New Battery Design Could Help Solar and Wind Energy Power the Grid

New Battery Design Could Help Solar and Wind Energy Power the Grid

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have designed a low-cost, long-life battery that could enable solar and wind energy to become major suppliers to the electrical grid.

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2013/05/new-battery-design-could-help-solar-and-wind-energy-power-the-grid


NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells

 

NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells

10/1/13

It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy...It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy...

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2013/01/nrel-and-stanford-team-up-on-peel-and-stick-solar-cells


Why Should You Consider the Switch to Solar Power?

Installing solar panels on the roof of any home can be the ideal way to reduce electricity bills. Once the photovoltaic panels are installed, they’re relatively maintenance free and they’ll generate power for your home all year round.

As technology improves, modern solar panels can now be manufactured far more cost-effectively for more efficient panels. This means home owners benefit from reduced costs on installation and can take advantage of panels that are able to generate even more power than ever before.

Solar panels are able to convert the sun’s rays into electricity even on cloudy overcast days and will continue to generate power even in cold winter temperatures. Of course, during the sunny summer months the rate at which your solar panels generate power is a little higher.

With the ability to create your home’s own power all year round, you have the ideal way to keep your electricity costs to a minimum for years to come.

Reducing Electricity Consumption

In recent times, more Australian households are starting to feel the pinch of recent increases in the cost of electricity. In an effort to offset those extra costs, many people are searching for ways to reduce their electricity consumption.

For the majority of people, this usually means switching off TVs, DVDs and other appliances at the power point overnight or when they’re not in use. For others, it can mean upgrading from old 75W light globes to more energy efficient 5W light globes that create the same level of light with far less power used.

Regardless of the energy saving tactics tried, the reality is that the cost of electricity supply is still high. Installing solar panels onto the roof of your home can give you an efficient way to create power. This automatically reduces the amount you pay on power bills, making the budget stretch even further.

Government Rebates and Subsidies

The Federal Government offers rebates for installing solar panels into homes and businesses. These rebates work by issuing Small-scale Technology Certificates (STCs) to eligible households.

In most cases, you should earn an average of 1 STC per 1 megawatt-hour of renewable energy you generate, based on the amount of energy your solar system is anticipated to generate over a 15 year period. Those STCs can be sold, traded or bought, kind of like a form of currency.

However, most solar panel suppliers and installers are happy to offer discounts on the purchase price and installation of your solar system in return for the STCs your panels will earn.

This provides you with generous up-front discounts for buying your solar panels, making it a cost-effective way to create your own power and keep your energy bills to a minimum.

You may also be eligible for a solar fee-in tariff. The Queensland Government currently regulates an 8 cents feed-in tariff across the entire state. This means any electricity you generate from your photovoltaic solar panels that isn’t used by your home’s regular usage gets fed back into the grid. If you create a surplus, that feed-in tariff can be put towards reducing your next power bill, or potentially even creating a small income for your family.

The best way to choose what sized solar panel system you need for your home is to discuss requirements with a solar panel installation specialist.


Worldwide Uptake Statistics of Solar Panels

Solar PV Energy Fastest Growing Renewable Energy Source in the 21st Century

According to the International Energy Agency, solar photovoltaic energy has experienced the fastest growth of all renewable energy technologies in the 21st century on a global scale. Further analysis shows that there is a good chance solar energy could cover a third of the world's demand by 2060.

Understanding Solar Energy

Solar energy represents the creation of electricity from sunlight. This is done either via photovoltaic systems—commonly referred to as solar panels—and concentrated solar power. Solar panels transform sunlight directly into electricity via a photoelectric effect, while CSP systems employ lenses or mirrors to focus a large amount of sunlight into a small beam, which produces high levels of heat. The latter drives an engine that is usually connected to a power generator or is used in a thermochemical reaction.

On a global scale, CSP systems are growing in popularity, but solar PV systems are still far in the lead. The former account for roughly 1,100 MW of installed capacity, while the latter make up the rest.

The Growth of Renewable Energy Sources and Solar PV

Renewable energy is considered to be any form of energy that is obtained from natural processes that renew themselves faster than they can be consumed, such as wind, sunlight, water, and more. While these types of energy sources have been the key to the growth of the clean energy sector on a global sector, the most significant expansion has been experienced by wind and solar photovoltaic technology.

There has been a significant growth in support for solar PV, especially on a governmental scale, with countries across the world adopting policies designed to address developments in the market and to help reduce costs. The adoption of such policies has played a key role in the success of solar PV on a global scale.

Thus, between 2000 and 2011, solar PV experienced the fastest growth of any form of renewable power generation technology, with the cumulative installed capacity reaching approximately 65 gigawatts at the end of 2011. In 2000, the installed capacity was 1.5 gigawatts, clearly showing how popular solar energy has become.

In terms of actual production, Germany and Italy generated a little more than half of the total capacity on a global scale, with Japan, Spain, the United States, and China following.

The Future of Solar Panels

The IEA released a report in which they claimed that there's a good chance solar power could cover up to one third of the world's energy requirements by 2060. However, there is a problem. For this vision to become a reality, a wide range of policies need to be adopted across the world, including the provision of incentives for those making the switch, to subsidisation for research and development. Furthermore, other obstacles would have to be removed, such as access to electrical grids.

Despite the obstacles it may face, solar energy will continue to grow on a global scale. Though it may be a while before it is competitive without the need for subsidies and incentives, that moment will arrive, and it might be sooner than some predict.


Will the grid beat off solar + storage?

Within the clean energy movement there is a sub-cult that holds onto a vision that humanity will retreat into small, self-sufficient community units that will stick it to the big utility man and disconnect from the grid (Grid separatists: Lessons from an energy uprising, November 19). The huge rise in network charges since 2007 plus the plunging cost of solar PV have helped to popularise this idea.

At the same time, the solar industry confronts a situation where households pay something like 25 to 52 cents to purchase electricity from the grid, yet they only get paid 8 cents for electricity they export. This has focused the industry on how households might minimise their use of the grid for both imports and exports and maximise use of electricity from their own power system.

Solar businesses also realise that the power companies and their state government owners aren’t too happy about solar eating their lunch and are looking to retaliate. Importantly, they’re worried regulators seem happy to oblige the suppliers. For example, the Queensland government’s utility regulator proposed special charges of several hundred dollars just for households with solar. Then, shortly after tabling this recommendation, the head of the regulator leaves to take up the role as head of the lobby group for electricity networks.

These fears are further reinforced by the ACCC’s Rod Sims (who ultimately controls the Australian Energy Regulator) who when asked recently on Radio National why electricity prices are going up beyond the carbon price, thinks to cite solar PV first and increased network charges second – yet network cost increases have completely dwarfed the costs imposed from solar PV. Furthermore, increases in retailer costs are on par with solar PV, according to analysis from the Australian Energy Market Commission.

So one can understand the considerable focus and hopes the solar sector is placing on use of technologies, particularly batteries, for minimising households’ reliance on the grid.

Yet there are lots of good reasons for having everyone connected up to a large, geographically spread-out grid. In the interview video below with Professor Michael Weinhold, Siemens Energy chief technology officer, we chat about how the rise of solar is challenging existing electricity market structures, advancements in energy storage and whether we might see a disintegration towards household self-sufficiency using solar in conjunction with batteries. 

 http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/21/solar-energy/will-grid-beat-solar-storage?utm_source=exact&utm_medium=email&utm_content=521208&utm_campaign=cs_daily&modapt=

Nowhere is this more stark than in Germany, Prof Weinhold's home country.

In his own state of Bavaria, solar PV capacity is almost equal to overall system peak demand. But this large amount of solar generation, which receives a guaranteed tariff detached from broader electricity market supply and demand, is creating major challenges for managing the wider electricity market.

Weinhold is excited about the prospects for advances in energy storage. Indeed, he thinks there’s still room for significant advances in the old lead-acid battery. But he also thinks economies of scale and the greater diversity and reliability of large grids mean that retreating to self-contained household power plants will be sub-optimal.

The logic behind this is pretty straightforward. In your house, if you add up all the appliances you could conceivably have on all at once it comes to quite a bit of power. During preparation of dinner you could have the fridge, TV, toaster, microwave, kettle, lights, oven and even air-conditioner all going at once. Maybe just for a short period, but it could easily add-up to 8 kilowatts. Meanwhile, your next door neighbour had dinner an hour ago, and they’ve gone out to the movies, switching everything off in the house except the fridge. They’re drawing maybe 300 watts peak. But an hour ago they had everything on while you were still to get home from work.

If we try to meet you and your neighbour’s needs so both could be self-contained we might need 16 kilowatts of generating capacity, but across both we can get away with 10. Now, multiply this out across an entire city, and even a nation, and you start to see how interconnecting a range of demand points can level out peaks in demand, reducing the amount of expensive generating capacity we might need. 

Also, think about the weather. As a single household you’ll see times when it isn’t sunny and your solar system will produce little generation. But somewhere else it is sunny and in another place it’s really windy. Being able to draw on these distant resources helps us reduce the amount of expensive energy storage and generating capacity we might need while often requiring little additional network infrastructure.

It seems likely that for some time to come we’ll be better off sharing the load of meeting our electricity needs across large numbers of premises and generators, rather than going for household or community self-sufficiency. 

Still, while the grid is a very useful thing and consumers should pay for the capacity they use, it doesn’t mean that electricity suppliers are owed a living. Consumers that reduce their overall demand as well as their peak demand are doing exactly what society needs – they are improving economic efficiency and reducing the risks of climate change.

Consumers shouldn’t have to pay for suppliers' misjudgments on technological change and investments that have proven to have showed flagrant disregard for the harm caused by carbon emissions.


Electricity the scariest cost for Aussies

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Australians spend more on petrol each week than electricity, but it is rising power bills that worry people most. 

A survey by consumer group Choice, non-profit group the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Energy Efficiency Council has found 84 per cent of households are concerned about energy costs, despite them spending more on other cost-of-living expenses.

Choice CEO Alan Kirkland says this is not a surprise, given memories of rising bills are fresh.

"Electricity prices have risen by more than 50 per cent over the past five years, largely driven by increased costs for poles and wires," Mr Kirkland said.

"When they try to shop around for a better deal, they find it difficult to compare the confusing array of offers from energy retailers."

The average Australian household spends 53 per cent more on fuel for vehicles ($60 a week) than energy, such as gas and electricity ($39 a week), according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

But Choice says power bills worry people more because usage is harder to keep track of, and bills come quarterly.

Along with further energy market reform, Choice urges state governments to do more to improve energy efficiency in disadvantaged households.

The survey showed 76 per cent support for helping homes and businesses save energy, and continued support for government assistance to low-income households.

The Brotherhood of St Laurence's Damian Sullivan pointed out that while taxpayers want state government action to drive down bills, they also don't want incentives for renewable energy to be wound back.

"Householders don't want action for energy affordability to come at the expense of a renewable energy," he said.

http://finance.ninemsn.com.au/newsbusiness/aap/8764278/electricity-the-scariest-cost-for-aussies


Queenslanders' electricity bills 'would soar'

Unions say Queenslanders will face skyrocketing electricity bills if the state government sells off power assets.

Premier Campbell Newman has reignited the debate about privatisation, flagging the sale of electricity generators and the long-term leases of two Queensland ports.

Queensland Council of Unions (QCU) president John Battams says selling off public assets will hurt Queenslanders' hip pockets.

"It's been shown elsewhere in Australia that privatisation leads to higher costs to consumers," he told ABC radio.

"Costs have already gone through the roof - if they proceed with this move to privatise their electricity assets, Queenslanders will be looking at much higher bills into the future."

Mr Newman told a business luncheon on Tuesday that leasing the Port of Townsville and Port of Gladstone were options that had to be examined.

He said his government had agreed to further investigate selling off power generators, but insisted the state's electricity distributors - Energex, Ergon and Powerlink - were off limits.

He's confident that once Queenslanders "learn the truth" about outsourcing they will appreciate the role of the private sector in providing services.

However, he vowed his government would not sell off any public assets without a mandate.

http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/4/energy-markets/queenslanders-electricity-bills-would-soar


Aust. hits 2 million solar

By a staff reporter

Australians have now installed more than two million small-scale renewable energy systems, the Clean Energy Regulator has confirmed. This was composed of 1,161,245 solar photovoltaic systems, 669,281 solar hot water units and 173,101 heat pump water heaters as well as a small number of micro hydro and small wind turbines.

The regulator said that small-scale systems, assisted by falling system costs and coupled with financial incentives derived from the Renewable Energy Target, had become "more and more affordable" for everyday Australians

"This comes only eight months after reaching one million rooftop solar photovoltaic installations, providing a strong indication that investment in small-scale renewable energy continues to flourish in Australia," the regulator said.

The regulator estimates the two million small-scale installations have a capacity to generate or displace approximately 6882 gigawatt hours of electricity annually, with 4182 gigawatt hours generated from small-scale solar, wind and hydro installations and a further 2700 gigawatt hours displaced by solar hot water systems and air source heat pumps.

This equates to the amount of electricity required to power approximately 1.04 million Australian homes for a year, the CER said, enough to power all Perth, Hobart, Darwin and Canberra households combined.

http://www.businessspectator.com.au


Solar Power and Wind Power Consumption in Queensland

The number of residential homes in Queensland generating their own electricity by way of solar PV systems is still growing. Admittedly, the rate of growth has slowed a little since the peak in 2010, thanks to the changes in the feed-in-tariff rates and changes in renewable energy rebates.

Yet, those homeowners and business owners who do opt to generate their own solar power benefit from paying less on their utility bills. The number of solar PV systems across Australia is also responsible for generating more than 3,000 MW of solar power, thanks to more than 1 million solar system installations across the country.

Increase in Solar Power Consumption

In April 2013, we reached the remarkable milestone of 1 million solar PV systems installed across Australia. However, it wasn’t until December 2013 that Queensland reached the milestone of generating 1 GW point of solar PV energy by way of solar PV installations alone.

A staggering 22% of Queensland dwellings feature rooftop solar panels, showing that more consumers are willing to look at alternative options to help hedge against the increasing costs of electricity.

In fact, studies estimate that homes with solar panels can help to decrease the total electricity demand during the summer peak periods by more than 50%. At peak times when power stations struggle to keep up with energy consumption demands, the number of rooftop solar systems generating additional power for homes and businesses plays a large role in reducing overload situations.

Studies also show that almost two-thirds of the amount of solar power generated on site for a residential home was actually used within the home over the course of an entire day. During peak electricity consumption times, the usage amounts rose to around 80% being used within the home, with 20% being returned to the grid.

Slow Uptake for Wind Power Consumption

However, it’s also worth noting that Australia is quite unique in the world in terms of choosing to install rooftop solar systems. Many other countries take advantage of wind generators to help generate electricity.

Compared to world standards, Australia has excellent wind resources available that could be considered under-utilised. In 2010, South Australia boasted almost half of the country’s wind power capacity, with around 20% of the state’s electricity requirements being generated by wind power farms.  Victoria also boasts generous wind power generation farms, generating around 25% of Australia’s electricity capacity, with more projects planned for the future to increase capacity even further.

Yet various locations around Queensland and New South Wales offer excellent wind resources that may be under-utilised. At this time, Queensland’s Windy Hill Wind Farm is the only power station operating by wind power in the state, with two small facilities operating on Thursday Island and North Keppel Island.

It’s unfortunate that Queensland has been slower to take advantage of wind power technology. While solar systems may be ideal for generating power throughout the sunny hours of the day, they can’t generate anything during the night. By comparison, wind generators are capable of generating power day or night at any time of the year, as long as there’s wind available.